Our Mission

 

Gede works with those who suffer from underserved and stigmatized health burdens to achieve long term positive change at the community level through high quality research (often into prevalence and impact), catalytic partnerships and advocacy.

Gede is currently working with Government agencies, civil society organisations and donors to, (i) assess the prevalence and impact of common mental disorders in people living with, and affected by, HIV-AIDS, (ii) develop appropriate ways in which to address the symbiotic relationship between mental illness (and epilepsy) and livelihoods at the community level, (iii) develop culturally validated tools to support the appropriate diagnosis of mental health conditions among orphans and vulnerable children, and, (iv) provide support to orphans and vulnerable children through income generating skills in particular.

Gede’s current programme reflects a long institutional history within underserved and stigmatized health burdens which started in 2002 when the Foundation became one of the first organizations in Nigeria to open its doors to people living with HIV-AIDS at a time when little service delivery existed across the country. Gede very quickly became known as an organization willing to address the root causes of HIV-AIDS stigma and to offer clinical services to those who would otherwise ‘go without’ – often in remote locations or through the Foundation’s innovative home care delivery programme.

The running of a clinical programme provided a perfect launching pad for the Foundation’s research into the impact of mental illness on people living with, and affected by, HIV-AIDS. In 2015, working with the Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, Gede undertook Nigeria’s largest every prevalence study into common mental disorders in a sample of over 1000 people living with HIV-AIDS. This peer reviewed study will be published and disseminated by the middle of 2016. Gede has also started work with partners on the cultural validation of mental health diagnosis tools for use in community based OVC programmes.

In March 2016, Gede started work, as a BasicNeeds franchise (funded by Grand Challenges Canada), on addressing the many challenges faced by people (and their carers) living with mental illness. The two year project will include, (i) the delivery of mental health diagnosis and treatment services at the community level, (ii) the creation and strengthening of community based mental health support networks, (iii) livelihood support for those who, due to their mental illness, have dropped out of income generating activities, and, (iv) policy level advocacy aimed at encouraging Government plans to include mental health. Find out more about this programme at -

http://www.basicneeds.org/gede-foundation-joins-as-basicneeds-first-franchisee-in-nigeria/

Gede’s programme of activities also includes work to support the educational needs of orphans and vulnerable children in Cross River State and Federal Capital Territory. The Foundation’s projects (generously supported by donors the Addax Oryx Foundation and UNICEM) provide OVC with school fees and training on income generating activities which are both designed to prevent children from drifting into crime and commercial sex work as they get older.

Gede works with those who suffer from underserved and stigmatized health burdens to achieve long term positive change at the community level through high quality research (often into prevalence and impact), catalytic partnerships and advocacy.

Gede is currently working with Government agencies, civil society organisations and donors to, (i) assess the prevalence and impact of common mental disorders in people living with, and affected by, HIV-AIDS, (ii) develop appropriate ways in which to address the symbiotic relationship between mental illness (and epilepsy) and livelihoods at the community level, (iii) develop culturally validated tools to support the appropriate diagnosis of mental health conditions among orphans and vulnerable children, and, (iv) provide support to orphans and vulnerable children through income generating skills in particular.

Gede’s current programme reflects a long institutional history within underserved and stigmatized health burdens which started in 2002 when the Foundation became one of the first organizations in Nigeria to open its doors to people living with HIV-AIDS at a time when little service delivery existed across the country. Gede very quickly became known as an organization willing to address the root causes of HIV-AIDS stigma and to offer clinical services to those who would otherwise ‘go without’ – often in remote locations or through the Foundation’s innovative home care delivery programme.

The running of a clinical programme provided a perfect launching pad for the Foundation’s research into the impact of mental illness on people living with, and affected by, HIV-AIDS. In 2015, working with the Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, Gede undertook Nigeria’s largest every prevalence study into common mental disorders in a sample of over 1000 people living with HIV-AIDS. This peer reviewed study will be published and disseminated by the middle of 2016. Gede has also started work with partners on the cultural validation of mental health diagnosis tools for use in community based OVC programmes.

In March 2016, Gede started work, as a BasicNeeds franchise (funded by Grand Challenges Canada), on addressing the many challenges faced by people (and their carers) living with mental illness. The two year project will include, (i) the delivery of mental health diagnosis and treatment services at the community level, (ii) the creation and strengthening of community based mental health support networks, (iii) livelihood support for those who, due to their mental illness, have dropped out of income generating activities, and, (iv) policy level advocacy aimed at encouraging Government plans to include mental health. Find out more about this programme at -

http://www.basicneeds.org/gede-foundation-joins-as-basicneeds-first-franchisee-in-nigeria/

Gede’s programme of activities also includes work to support the educational needs of orphans and vulnerable children in Cross River State and Federal Capital Territory. The Foundation’s projects (generously supported by donors the Addax Oryx Foundation and UNICEM) provide OVC with school fees and training on income generating activities which are both designed to prevent children from drifting into crime and commercial sex work as they get older.


While we welcome an increasing openness to talk about mental health in Nigeria, our aim is to go further and grow a new generation who can itemize mental well-being and its high cost on our private and public spheres of life.
— Dr. Jennifer Jamilah Douglas-Abubakar, Ph.D., Founder, Gede Foundation